Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-13-2020

Identifier

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0227777; PMCID: PMC6957180

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Given the limited evidence available, the impact of nasogastric (NG) tube placement on swallowing in children is not well understood. When a child needs to be fed enterally, the current standard is to initially place an NG tube and leave it in place for the first few months of supplemental or total enteral nutrition. It is important to understand if placement of NG tubes has a negative effect on a patient's swallow.

METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of those children who had videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) to identify all children who had an NG tube in place at the time of swallow study. Age and sex matched children were identified who had undergone VFSS without an NG in place. These charts were reviewed for diagnosis at the time of the VFSS and presence or absence of aspiration or laryngeal penetrations.

RESULTS: Sixty-three children with NG tubes were identified, along with 63 age and sex matched children without NG tubes in place, at the time of VFSS. Ages ranged from 7 days to 13 years. The NG group had a significantly higher proportion demonstrating aspiration (46% vs. 23.8%, p = 0.0089).

CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the need for further prospective evaluation of NG tubes and their effect on swallow, as well as more careful consideration of prolonged NG tube placement in patients with feeding problems. Consideration should be given to removal of the NG prior to VFSS to prevent the impact of NG placement on results of the swallow study which could lead to inappropriate modifications to the patient's care plan.

Journal Title

PLoS One

Volume

15

Issue

1

First Page

0227777

Last Page

0227777

MeSH Keywords

Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Deglutition; Female; Fluoroscopy; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Intubation, Gastrointestinal; Male; Retrospective Studies

Keywords

Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Deglutition; Female; Fluoroscopy; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Intubation, Gastrointestinal; Male; Retrospective Studies

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