Title

Managing food allergies in schools.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2014

Identifier

DOI: 10.1007/s11882-014-0467-z

Abstract

Food allergies are estimated to affect as many as 8 % of children with 2.5 % being allergic to peanut products. Based on the results of recent surveys, this prevalence has been increasing over the last few decades for unknown reasons. As children with food allergies reach school age, the issue is becoming more common in schools. For that reason, schools are now required to be prepared to take responsibility for the safety of food-allergic students. This review discusses the common problems surrounding management of food allergies in the school setting along with reasonable recommendations for addressing those problems. The most important component of food allergy management is for the student to get an accurate diagnosis and to then discuss development of an anaphylaxis action plan with their health-care provider. Each school should insist that a copy of such a plan be provided for each student with food allergy and that epinephrine is readily available should a student have an anaphylactic reaction. In addition to epinephrine, it is essential that school personnel be properly trained to recognize and treat allergic reactions should they occur. Known deficiencies in school preparedness have been documented in previous literature, and consequently, both state and the federal government have begun to implement policies to help with school preparedness.

Journal Title

Current allergy and asthma reports

Volume

14

Issue

10

First Page

467

Last Page

467

MeSH Keywords

Adolescent; Anaphylaxis; Child; Epinephrine; Food Hypersensitivity; Humans; Patient Care Planning; School Health Services; Sympathomimetics; United States

Keywords

Anaphylaxis; Epinephrine; Food Hypersensitivity; Patient Care Planning; School Health Services; Sympathomimetics

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