Title

Ontogeny of Scaling Factors for Pediatric Physiology-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulation: Microsomal Protein Per Gram of Liver.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2022

Identifier

DOI: 10.1124/dmd.121.000623

Abstract

Microsomal protein per gram of liver (MPPGL) is an important scaling factor for bottom-up physiology-based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation, but data in pediatrics are limited. Therefore, MPPGL was determined in 160 liver samples from pediatric (n = 129) and adult (n = 31) donors obtained from four sources: the University of Maryland Brain and Tissue Bank (UMBTB), tissue retrieval services at the University of Minnesota and University of Pittsburgh, and Sekisui-Xenotech. Tissues were homogenized and subjected to differential centrifugation to prepare microsomes, and cytochrome c reductase activities in tissue homogenates and microsomes were used to estimate cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) activity as a marker of microsomal recovery; microsomal POR content was also assessed by quantitative proteomics. MPPGL values varied 5- to 10-fold within various age groups/developmental stages, and tissue source was identified as a contributing factor. Using a "trimmed" dataset comprised of samples ranging from 3 to 18 years of age common to the four sources, POR protein abundance and activity in microsomes and POR activity in homogenates was lower in UMBTB samples (autopsy) compared with other sources (perfused/flash-frozen). Regression analyses revealed that the UMBTB samples were driving an apparent age effect as no effect of age on log-transformed MPPGL values was observed when the UMBTB samples were excluded. We conclude that a mean±SD MPPGL value of 30.4±1.7 mg/g is representative between one month postnatal age and early adulthood. Potential source effects should be considered for studies involving tissue samples from multiple sources with different procurement and processing procedures. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Microsomal protein per gram of liver (MPPGL) is an important scaling factor for bottom up PBPK modeling and simulation, but data in pediatrics are limited. Although MPPGL varies 5- to 10-fold at a given developmental stage, a value of 30.4 ± 1.7 mg/g (mean ± SD) is representative between one month postnatal age and early adulthood. However, when tissue samples are obtained from multiple sources, different procurement and processing procedures may influence the results and should be taken into consideration.

Journal Title

Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals

Volume

50

Issue

1

First Page

24

Last Page

32

Library Record

Share

COinS