Title

Current Barriers in Pursuing Otolaryngology as an Osteopathic Applicant and Proposed Goals for the Future.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-1-2022

Identifier

DOI: 10.1177/01945998211029548

Abstract

The osteopathic (DO) medical profession has seen a substantial increase in popularity, evident by the drastic increase in the DO physician workforce and increasing number of DO graduates in the United States. Osteopathic medical schools have historically been primary care focused, resulting in a majority of their graduates pursuing practice in those specialties. This focus may be inadvertently creating a disadvantageous environment for DO students who aim to pursue specialized or traditionally competitive fields in medicine. Otolaryngology is a prime example of osteopathic underrepresentation, as there is currently a significantly low percentage of DO residents in otolaryngology residency programs and practicing DO otolaryngologists. Given the recent American Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA) merger between osteopathic and allopathic (MD) residency programs, it is of great value to further discuss avenues for progress and mitigation of barriers.

Journal Title

Otolaryngology and head and neck surgery

Volume

166

Issue

3

First Page

410

Last Page

412

Keywords

medical education; osteopathic; otolaryngology; transition in training

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