Submitting/Presenting Author

Joseph LopezFollow

Presenter Status

Fellow

Abstract Type

Research

Primary Mentor

Rebecca Rentea MD

Start Date

12-5-2021 11:30 AM

End Date

12-5-2021 1:30 PM

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Description

Purpose: Malone antegrade continence enemas (MACE) provide a conduit in which the patient can achieve improved continence, be clean of stool, and gain independence in maintaining bowel function. The Mini-ACE® is a low-profile balloon button that is used to facilitate administration of antegrade enemas. We sought to describe our practice and short-term outcomes.

Methods: We present our experience using the Mini-ACE® at Children’s Mercy – Kansas City from April 2019 to September 2020. Patient demographics, colorectal diagnoses, tube sizes, flush regimens, patient experience and outcomes were examined.

Results: Thirty patients were included; 18 (60%) were male. The average age at Mini-ACE® insertion was 9.3 years (SD +/- 5). The most common diagnoses were functional constipation (n=12), anorectal malformation (n=9) and Hirschsprung disease (n=3). Eighteen of 30 patients/families (60%) reported no post-operative problems. Six (20%) noted inadvertent tube dislodgement requiring replacement, but only one required replacement within one month of initial placement. No patients required operative revision.

Conclusion: While post-operative outcomes are limited, the Mini-ACE® appears to be a safe and low-profile alternative to other antegrade continence enema access devices. Further research is needed directly comparing complications and patient satisfaction rates between different MACE devices and overall quality of life.

Comments

Abstract Only.

MeSH Keywords

Anorectal malformation; Hirschsprung disease; functional constipation; bowel management; Malone appendicostomy

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May 12th, 11:30 AM May 12th, 1:30 PM

Mini-ACE® low-profile appendicostomy button

Purpose: Malone antegrade continence enemas (MACE) provide a conduit in which the patient can achieve improved continence, be clean of stool, and gain independence in maintaining bowel function. The Mini-ACE® is a low-profile balloon button that is used to facilitate administration of antegrade enemas. We sought to describe our practice and short-term outcomes.

Methods: We present our experience using the Mini-ACE® at Children’s Mercy – Kansas City from April 2019 to September 2020. Patient demographics, colorectal diagnoses, tube sizes, flush regimens, patient experience and outcomes were examined.

Results: Thirty patients were included; 18 (60%) were male. The average age at Mini-ACE® insertion was 9.3 years (SD +/- 5). The most common diagnoses were functional constipation (n=12), anorectal malformation (n=9) and Hirschsprung disease (n=3). Eighteen of 30 patients/families (60%) reported no post-operative problems. Six (20%) noted inadvertent tube dislodgement requiring replacement, but only one required replacement within one month of initial placement. No patients required operative revision.

Conclusion: While post-operative outcomes are limited, the Mini-ACE® appears to be a safe and low-profile alternative to other antegrade continence enema access devices. Further research is needed directly comparing complications and patient satisfaction rates between different MACE devices and overall quality of life.