Presenter Status

Fellow

Abstract Type

Research

Primary Mentor

Meredith Dreyer, PhD

Start Date

2-5-2022 11:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2022 1:30 PM

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Description

Background: Estimates for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid sleep disorders range from 25-75% (4,5,10). Among childhood sleep disorders, behavioral insomnia is one of the most common, with the treatment of choice being behavioral parent training (BPT) (4). BPT therefore is a common treatment element for both sleep disturbance and ADHD and presents a unique opportunity for more holistic pediatric care.

Objectives/Goal: Our objective was to implement and evaluate a behavioral sleep intervention in an ADHD behavioral parent training (BPT) program. Goals of the intervention were to decrease behavioral sleep symptoms, increase sleep duration, and decrease ADHD impairment.

Methods/Design: Brief targeted sleep education was integrated into the current ADHD BPT curriculum for parents/guardians of children ages 6-12 years. Our sample was 78 participants. Surveys were collected to evaluate sleep behavioral problems, sleep duration, and ADHD impairment. A comparison analysis was completed to evaluate the behavioral sleep intervention.

Results: [Preliminary Analysis] Survey response rate was about 70%. 49 participants (63%) attended the entire intervention, and 66 participants (85%) attended 6 of 8 classes. 50% of patients had clinically significant behavioral sleep problems (CSHQ total score ≥30). There were no significant pre-post differences in either the participant’s total CSHQ scores (-1.8, p=0.071) or their total sleep duration (-0.12 hours, p=0.990). The mean baseline and post-intervention total CSHQ scores were 30.80 and 29.67 respectively. Mean baseline and post-intervention sleep durations were 9.57 hours and 9.56 hours respectively. However, 86% of participants reported the sleep education was helpful and 65% endorsed that their child was sleeping better. There was significant improvement in child impairment (-3.84, p=0.00).

Conclusions: Many children with ADHD have sleep symptoms compounding their ADHD symptoms. As predicted by previous studies, ADHD BPT shows a significant decrease in ADHD impairment. Objectively, we did not find our intervention changed sleep outcomes; however, subjectively families reported intervention benefits. There were several study limitations. Our intervention was brief and may not be sufficient for severe sleep problems. The timing of the sleep intervention and data collection was suboptimal due to summer vacations and lack of long-term follow-up.

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May 2nd, 11:30 AM May 2nd, 1:30 PM

Behavioral Parent Training for ADHD and Sleep: A Dream Pair

Background: Estimates for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid sleep disorders range from 25-75% (4,5,10). Among childhood sleep disorders, behavioral insomnia is one of the most common, with the treatment of choice being behavioral parent training (BPT) (4). BPT therefore is a common treatment element for both sleep disturbance and ADHD and presents a unique opportunity for more holistic pediatric care.

Objectives/Goal: Our objective was to implement and evaluate a behavioral sleep intervention in an ADHD behavioral parent training (BPT) program. Goals of the intervention were to decrease behavioral sleep symptoms, increase sleep duration, and decrease ADHD impairment.

Methods/Design: Brief targeted sleep education was integrated into the current ADHD BPT curriculum for parents/guardians of children ages 6-12 years. Our sample was 78 participants. Surveys were collected to evaluate sleep behavioral problems, sleep duration, and ADHD impairment. A comparison analysis was completed to evaluate the behavioral sleep intervention.

Results: [Preliminary Analysis] Survey response rate was about 70%. 49 participants (63%) attended the entire intervention, and 66 participants (85%) attended 6 of 8 classes. 50% of patients had clinically significant behavioral sleep problems (CSHQ total score ≥30). There were no significant pre-post differences in either the participant’s total CSHQ scores (-1.8, p=0.071) or their total sleep duration (-0.12 hours, p=0.990). The mean baseline and post-intervention total CSHQ scores were 30.80 and 29.67 respectively. Mean baseline and post-intervention sleep durations were 9.57 hours and 9.56 hours respectively. However, 86% of participants reported the sleep education was helpful and 65% endorsed that their child was sleeping better. There was significant improvement in child impairment (-3.84, p=0.00).

Conclusions: Many children with ADHD have sleep symptoms compounding their ADHD symptoms. As predicted by previous studies, ADHD BPT shows a significant decrease in ADHD impairment. Objectively, we did not find our intervention changed sleep outcomes; however, subjectively families reported intervention benefits. There were several study limitations. Our intervention was brief and may not be sufficient for severe sleep problems. The timing of the sleep intervention and data collection was suboptimal due to summer vacations and lack of long-term follow-up.

 

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