Presenter Status

Resident/Psychology Intern

Abstract Type

Research

Primary Mentor

Joy Solano, MD MPHE

Start Date

5-5-2022 11:30 AM

End Date

5-5-2022 1:30 PM

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Description

Background: The size and structure of large academic teaching teams can create a barrier to communication and relationship-building with caregivers. Studies have shown that from a patient perspective, being able to name their doctor and identify their role is important. Benefits include increased patient satisfaction, improved relationships in line with the family-centered care movement, and improved patient safety. Although important, studies in both adults and pediatrics have shown that patients and caregivers do not know who their doctors are. Acknowledging the hierarchy present on family-centered rounds is not only burdensome and confusing to patients and caregivers, but it can also pose a barrier to residents’ sense of autonomy. In a previous study with adult patients, the intern was seen as the “main doctor” by the majority of patients. There has never been a study to see who caregivers perceive as their child’s “main doctor” in pediatrics. In this study, we are interested in determining who families identify as their main doctor on a large teaching team. We hope these findings can help determine how to best introduce large teaching teams while also supporting resident autonomy.

Objectives/Goal:

1) Identify the frequency of caregivers who are aware that their child was going to be cared for by a large team of doctors

2) Describe who caregivers identify as their child’s main doctor as well as the leader (defined as person in charge) of the team

3) Determine whether certain presenter or patient characteristics are associated with rates of identifying the intern/senior resident as their child’s main physician/leader of the team

Methods/Design: This is a single-institution prospective cohort study using a convenience sample of caregivers admitted to the hospital on pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) teaching teams that conduct family-centered rounds (FCR). The caregiver is approached as soon as the rounding encounter is over. A four question survey is administered to the parents and answers are recorded in RedCap. Parents are asked to identify their main doctor and leader of the team using masked photographs of all members of the rounding team. Parents are then asked permission to obtain demographic data from their child’s chart, including age, gender, number of categories of complex chronic conditions, number of lifetime admissions, length of stay, and number of consultants involved in their child’s care.

Results: We are in the data collection phase and are actively observing rounds! Will have more concrete results in the next month.

Conclusions: Same as above!

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May 5th, 11:30 AM May 5th, 1:30 PM

Who is my child’s main doctor? Assessing caregiver perceptions of teaching teams at a pediatric tertiary care center.

Background: The size and structure of large academic teaching teams can create a barrier to communication and relationship-building with caregivers. Studies have shown that from a patient perspective, being able to name their doctor and identify their role is important. Benefits include increased patient satisfaction, improved relationships in line with the family-centered care movement, and improved patient safety. Although important, studies in both adults and pediatrics have shown that patients and caregivers do not know who their doctors are. Acknowledging the hierarchy present on family-centered rounds is not only burdensome and confusing to patients and caregivers, but it can also pose a barrier to residents’ sense of autonomy. In a previous study with adult patients, the intern was seen as the “main doctor” by the majority of patients. There has never been a study to see who caregivers perceive as their child’s “main doctor” in pediatrics. In this study, we are interested in determining who families identify as their main doctor on a large teaching team. We hope these findings can help determine how to best introduce large teaching teams while also supporting resident autonomy.

Objectives/Goal:

1) Identify the frequency of caregivers who are aware that their child was going to be cared for by a large team of doctors

2) Describe who caregivers identify as their child’s main doctor as well as the leader (defined as person in charge) of the team

3) Determine whether certain presenter or patient characteristics are associated with rates of identifying the intern/senior resident as their child’s main physician/leader of the team

Methods/Design: This is a single-institution prospective cohort study using a convenience sample of caregivers admitted to the hospital on pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) teaching teams that conduct family-centered rounds (FCR). The caregiver is approached as soon as the rounding encounter is over. A four question survey is administered to the parents and answers are recorded in RedCap. Parents are asked to identify their main doctor and leader of the team using masked photographs of all members of the rounding team. Parents are then asked permission to obtain demographic data from their child’s chart, including age, gender, number of categories of complex chronic conditions, number of lifetime admissions, length of stay, and number of consultants involved in their child’s care.

Results: We are in the data collection phase and are actively observing rounds! Will have more concrete results in the next month.

Conclusions: Same as above!

 

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