Title

Incidence, outcomes, and resource use in children with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2018

Identifier

DOI: 10.1111/pde.13383

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening cutaneous reactions, typically to drugs or infection. The incidence and outcomes of these conditions in children are unknown. The objective of this study was to report the overall burden of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in children in the United States.

METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of children and adolescents younger than 18 years of age using the 2009 and 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database.

RESULTS: We identified 1486 children and adolescents hospitalized with a diagnosis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. The national incidence per 100 000 was 6.3 for Stevens-Johnson syndrome, 0.7 for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap syndrome, and 0.5 for toxic epidermal necrolysis. The highest incidence in children was in those aged 11-15 years (38.4 per 100 000). Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap syndrome were associated with longer stay, greater mortality, and higher hospital charges than those with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Hospital mortality was highest in children with toxic epidermal necrolysis and in children aged 0-5 years.

CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in children is higher than reported in adults, and there are significant age-based variations in incidence and outcomes across the pediatric population. Further study is needed to determine the most effective treatment strategies to reduce costs and improve outcomes in children hospitalized with severe cutaneous reactions.

Journal Title

Pediatric dermatology

Volume

35

Issue

2

First Page

182

Last Page

187

MeSH Keywords

Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Cost of Illness; Databases, Factual; Female; Health Resources; Hospital Charges; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Incidence; Length of Stay; Male; Retrospective Studies; Stevens-Johnson Syndrome; United States

Keywords

Drug reaction; Mucous membrane disorders

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