Title

A Novel Pediatric Emergency Department Intervention to Improve Adolescent Sexual Health Care.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1-2019

Identifier

DOI: 10.1097/PEC.0000000000001670; PMCID: PMC6546505

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel educational intervention for physician trainees to improve sexual health care provision, including condom distribution, in the pediatric emergency department.

METHODS: Resident physicians and medical students in an urban pediatric emergency department viewed an evidence-based educational video on sexual health care provision. It featured role-plays and a description of the condom distribution process, and targeted trainees who provide health care to patients aged 14 years or more with potential genitourinary complaints. Trainees completed pre- and postintervention surveys to assess attitudes, motivation, and confidence for 4 recommended practices (Likert scale, 1 = not at all to 4 = extremely). We used Wilcoxon signed rank tests to assess differences in paired responses to motivation and confidence statements. A subset of 33 trainees completed a brief survey to assess condom distribution during emergency department clinical encounters.

RESULTS: Of 56 trainees, 51 (91%) participated: 53% female, 58% from pediatrics. At baseline, participants reported high levels of confidence and motivation to provide sexual health care. Postintervention, there were significant increases in the proportion of participants who reported greater motivation and confidence to (1) ask a parent to step out of the room, (2) obtain sexual history, (3) discuss condom use, and (4) offer condoms (all P < 0.05). Postintervention, fewer participants "agreed/strongly agreed" that there is inadequate time to obtain sexual histories (22% vs 45%; P < 0.05). Most (60%) sexually active patients accepted condoms during clinical care.

CONCLUSION: In this pediatric emergency department, a low-cost intervention showed promise to improve trainee attitudes, motivation, and confidence toward adolescent sexual health care provision. These data may inform strategies to improve access to care for this population.

Journal Title

Pediatric emergency care

Volume

35

Issue

6

First Page

397

Last Page

402

MeSH Keywords

Adolescent; Adult; Clinical Competence; Condoms; Dibenzocycloheptenes; Education, Medical; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Hospitals, Pediatric; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Physicians; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Health; Urban Health Services; Young Adult

Keywords

Adolescent; Adult; Clinical Competence; Condoms; Dibenzocycloheptenes; Education, Medical; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Hospitals, Pediatric; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Physicians; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Health; Urban Health Services; Young Adult

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