Title

Racial/ethnic disparities in amputation and revascularization: a nationwide inpatient sample study.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2014

Identifier

DOI: 10.1177/1538574413510618

Abstract

This study investigates whether ethnic minorities presenting with critical limb ischemia (CLI) are more likely to undergo major limb amputation compared to white patients. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was used to identify all patients admitted with CLI; lower extremity revascularization; and major lower extremity amputation from 1998 to 2005. The NIS identified 240 139 patients presenting with CLI--68.2% white, 19.5% black, 9.0% Hispanic, and 1.24% Asian. In all, 83 328 patients underwent revascularization--73.7% white, 15.9% black, 7.4% Hispanic, and 1.1% Asian. The majority of the interventions were open. In all, 111 548 patients underwent a major lower extremity amputation--61% white, 25.4% black, 10.1% Hispanic, and 1.1% Asian. The mean Charlson comorbidity scores for amputation were 2.1 for whites, 2.0 for blacks, 2.3 for Hispanics, and 2.5 for Asians (for all data, P < .05). Blacks make up a disproportionately higher proportion of patients admitted for CLI and undergoing amputation, with a lower proportion undergoing revascularization.

Journal Title

Vascular and endovascular surgery

Volume

48

Issue

1

First Page

34

Last Page

37

MeSH Keywords

African Americans; Amputation; Asian Continental Ancestry Group; Comorbidity; Critical Illness; Endovascular Procedures; Ethnic Groups; European Continental Ancestry Group; Healthcare Disparities; Hispanic Americans; Humans; Inpatients; Ischemia; Limb Salvage; Lower Extremity; Minority Groups; Risk Factors; Treatment Outcome; United States

Keywords

Race; Ethnic Groups; Disparities; Inequality; Amputees; Revascularization; Limb Ischemia

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