Title

ACG Clinical Report and Recommendations on Transition of Care in Children and Adolescents With Hereditary Polyposis Syndromes.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2021

Identifier

DOI: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000001140

Abstract

Transition of care (TOC) in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with chronic gastrointestinal disorders has received increased attention, especially in those with inflammatory bowel disease. AYAs with hereditary polyposis syndromes are a heterogeneous group of patients with overlapping and complex medical needs. These patients are particularly vulnerable because of the risk of loss of continuity of care and subsequent poor disease outcomes. The Pediatric Committee of the American College of Gastroenterology commissioned a report with recommendations on TOC in AYAs with hereditary polyposis syndromes. This report aims at achieving best practice by both pediatric and adult gastroenterologists despite the paucity of published evidence in this population reflected in the included PRISMA report. Therefore, the group extrapolated findings from the literature related to other chronic gastrointestinal disorders, and a high degree of expert consensus was scored for all recommendations. The report addresses TOC through identifying shared domains followed by specific recommendations in disease management, including models of care, providers and patient and socioeconomic factors relevant to TOC. Areas of strong emphasis include the need for early planning, flexibility in the transition process to maintain continuity during major surgical procedures, patient and family psychological readiness, liaison among team members addressing transition, and changing insurance coverage in this population.

Journal Title

The American journal of gastroenterology

Volume

116

Issue

4

First Page

638

Last Page

646

MeSH Keywords

Adenomatous Polyposis Coli; Adolescent; Child; Consensus; Disease Management; Humans; Patient Transfer; Societies, Medical; Syndrome; United States

Keywords

Adenomatous Polyposis Coli; Adolescent; Child; Consensus; Disease Management; Humans; Patient Transfer; Societies, Medical; Syndrome; United States

Library Record

Share

COinS