Title

Clinical outcomes following bowel resection versus reduction of intussusception.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2013

Identifier

DOI: 10.1016/j.jss.2013.03.001

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intussusception is most commonly managed with air-contrast reduction. However, when this fails, emergent operation with resection or manual reduction is indicated. It is not known if there are advantages to resection compared with manual reduction.

METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients receiving operative care for intussusception from February 2000 to December 2011. Patients undergoing intestinal resection were compared with those treated with manual reduction alone.

RESULTS: Of 111 patients, 49 underwent resection and 62 underwent manual reduction. Mean (±SD) time to oral intake favored manual reduction (2.1 ± 1.2 versus 2.6 ± 1.2 d, respectively, P=0.05). Manual reduction was associated with a greater need for repeat imaging (47% versus 18%, P=0.002) and the only recurrences were with manual reduction (8% versus 0%, P=0.1). Mean duration of stay was no different (P=0.36), nor was the need for reoperation (P=0.9).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing manual reduction have an increased number of radiographic imaging procedures. The surgeon should have a low threshold for resection for intussusceptions requiring operative management.

Journal Title

The Journal of surgical research

Volume

184

Issue

1

First Page

388

Last Page

391

MeSH Keywords

Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Digestive System Surgical Procedures; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Intestinal Obstruction; Intussusception; Length of Stay; Male; Morbidity; Ostomy; Radiography; Recovery of Function; Reoperation; Retrospective Studies; Treatment Outcome

Keywords

Children; Intestinal obstruction; Intussusception; Reduction

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