Title

Rotavirus strain trends during the postlicensure vaccine era: United States, 2008-2013

Creator(s)

Michael D. Bowen, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Slavica Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Mathew D. Esona, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Elizabeth N. Teel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Rashi Gautam, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Michele Sturgeon, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Parvin H. Azimi, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland
Carol J. Baker, Texas Children's Hospital
David I. Bernstein, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Julie A. Boom, Texas Children's Hospital
James Chappell, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Stephanie Donauer, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Kathryn M. Edwards, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Janet A. Englund, Seattle Children's Hospital
Natasha B. Halasa, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Christopher J. Harrison, Children's Mercy HospitalFollow
Samantha H. Johnston, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland
Eileen J. Klein, Seattle Children's Hospital
Monica M. McNeal, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Mary Moffatt, Children's Mercy HospitalFollow
Marcia A. Rench, Texas Children's Hospital
Leila C. Sahni, Texas Children's Hospital
Rangaraj Selvarangan, Children's Mercy HospitalFollow
Mary A. Staat, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Peter G. Szilagyi, University of California, Los Angeles
Geoffrey A. Weinberg, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
Mary E. Wikswo, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Umesh D. Parashar, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Daniel C. Payne, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2016

Identifier

DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiw233; PMCID: PMC5075963

Abstract

© The Author 2016.

Background. Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are a significant cause of pediatric gastroenteritis worldwide. The New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) has conducted active surveillance for RVA at pediatric hospitals and emergency departments at 3-7 geographically diverse sites in the United States since 2006.

Methods. Over 6 consecutive years, from 2008 to 2013, 1523 samples from NVSN sites that were tested positive by a Rotaclone enzyme immunoassay were submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for genotyping.

Results. In the 2009, 2010, and 2011 seasons, genotype G3P[8] was the predominant genotype throughout the network, with a 46%-84% prevalence. In the 2012 season, G12P[8] replaced G3P[8] as the most common genotype, with a 70% prevalence, and this trend persisted in 2013 (68.0% prevalence). Vaccine (RotaTeq; Rotarix) strains were detected in 0.6%-3.4% of genotyped samples each season. Uncommon and unusual strains (eg, G8P[4], G3P[24], G2P[8], G3P[4], G3P[6], G24P[14], G4P[6], and G9P[4]) were detected sporadically over the study period. Year, study site, and race were found to be significant predictors of genotype.

Conclusions. Continued active surveillance is needed to monitor RVA genotypes in the United States and to detect potential changes since vaccine licensure.

Journal Title

Journal of Infectious Diseases

Volume

214

Issue

5

First Page

732

Last Page

738

Keywords

Genotype, Prevalence, Rotavirus, Surveillance, Vaccine

Share

COinS