Presenter Status

Fellow

Abstract Type

Research

Primary Mentor

Susan Abdel-Rahman

Start Date

3-5-2022 11:30 AM

End Date

3-5-2022 1:30 PM

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Description

Background: Hemophilia represents a medical condition suited to individualization. Adherence with prophylactic antihemophilic factor regimens ranges from 6%-167%. Clinical decision support tools (CDS) have been shown to improve guideline compliance and enhance patient adherence.

Objectives/Goal: The objective of this study is to evaluate the usability, usefulness, and satisfaction of a pharmacology-driven, patient-facing antihemophilic factor CDS.

Methods/Design: A patient-facing CDS was created to allow patients and families to explore factor levels at any time during their regimen and with the administration of different dosing regimens. Development followed a user-centered design process to ensure development of a product targeted to the needs of its users and driven by features associated with successful CDS. Patients with hemophilia ages 10 years and above who are currently or were previously prescribed antihemophilic factor VII, VIII, or IX and parents of patients were approached to participate. Baseline demographics and technology use characteristics recorded. A structured virtual cognitive walkthrough was performed to record participant feedback and a modified usability questionnaire (PSSUQ v.3) administered at the conclusion of the session.

Results: Fifteen participants (9 female, 6 male, 80% white) completed the study; 6 patients (11-20 yr) and 9 parents of patients (34-52 yr) with hemophilia. All were proficient with mobile technology (86.7% iOS) reporting 2-8 hr of smartphone usage per day. All participants stated it was easy to understand the CDS layout and explore changes to dosing schedule. 93.3% and 86.7% reported understanding how to change the dose amount and simulate the new dose amount, respectively. All participants felt this tool will help understand medication dosing better and facilitate conversations with their provider. Changes regarding the content and layout were offered. Using a 5-point Likert Scale with 1 representing the least favorable response and 5 representing the most favorable, the PSSUQ revealed global system quality rated 4.56, information quality rated 4.48, interface quality rated 4.67, and satisfaction rated 4.67.

Conclusions: The layout and flow of our patient-facing CDS was well received by patients and families of patients with hemophilia. Participants reported a desire to use this application to understand medication dosing and improve conversations with their hematology providers. The output of the study has aided in identifying areas that represent an opportunity for improvement of the user interface.

MeSH Keywords

Pediatrics; Hemophilia; Clinical decision support system; Shared decision making

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May 3rd, 11:30 AM May 3rd, 1:30 PM

Patient-facing Antihemophilic Factor Clinical Decision Support Tool

Background: Hemophilia represents a medical condition suited to individualization. Adherence with prophylactic antihemophilic factor regimens ranges from 6%-167%. Clinical decision support tools (CDS) have been shown to improve guideline compliance and enhance patient adherence.

Objectives/Goal: The objective of this study is to evaluate the usability, usefulness, and satisfaction of a pharmacology-driven, patient-facing antihemophilic factor CDS.

Methods/Design: A patient-facing CDS was created to allow patients and families to explore factor levels at any time during their regimen and with the administration of different dosing regimens. Development followed a user-centered design process to ensure development of a product targeted to the needs of its users and driven by features associated with successful CDS. Patients with hemophilia ages 10 years and above who are currently or were previously prescribed antihemophilic factor VII, VIII, or IX and parents of patients were approached to participate. Baseline demographics and technology use characteristics recorded. A structured virtual cognitive walkthrough was performed to record participant feedback and a modified usability questionnaire (PSSUQ v.3) administered at the conclusion of the session.

Results: Fifteen participants (9 female, 6 male, 80% white) completed the study; 6 patients (11-20 yr) and 9 parents of patients (34-52 yr) with hemophilia. All were proficient with mobile technology (86.7% iOS) reporting 2-8 hr of smartphone usage per day. All participants stated it was easy to understand the CDS layout and explore changes to dosing schedule. 93.3% and 86.7% reported understanding how to change the dose amount and simulate the new dose amount, respectively. All participants felt this tool will help understand medication dosing better and facilitate conversations with their provider. Changes regarding the content and layout were offered. Using a 5-point Likert Scale with 1 representing the least favorable response and 5 representing the most favorable, the PSSUQ revealed global system quality rated 4.56, information quality rated 4.48, interface quality rated 4.67, and satisfaction rated 4.67.

Conclusions: The layout and flow of our patient-facing CDS was well received by patients and families of patients with hemophilia. Participants reported a desire to use this application to understand medication dosing and improve conversations with their hematology providers. The output of the study has aided in identifying areas that represent an opportunity for improvement of the user interface.

 

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